Author Archives: whoolery

The (Actual) Textbook Narcissist

For some reason (I will leave that to you, dear reader), the term “narcissist” has been used a lot recently in the media and in personal conversations.  Sometimes people even use the term “textbook narcissist” to describe a well-known public figure.  Since I am both a psychologist and columnist, I thought I would share with […]

Don’t Put Tribe Before Truth

Just when we thought the race for president couldn’t get more discouraging to watch, this week we were faced with the publishing of a tape where the Republican nominee was unspeakably crude, sexually aggressive, and lewd.  I wish that my teenage daughters didn’t have to see or hear Trump talk about women in the way […]

Happy Birthday to My Older Brother

Watch this first: https://youtu.be/wEEsWEOqpGY There is a devotion of a boy to his older brother that defies any kind of logic.  My brother Scott, three years older than I am, was always there.  And maybe that is part of the mystery.  A younger brother has never known a life without his brother there.  He was […]

To My Non-Christian Friends: The Meaning of Easter

Today and this last week Christians around the world celebrate the holiday called Easter. Because it is less commercialized and less about buying things, it takes a back seat to Christmas.  That holiday just about everybody knows about even if they don’t know much about its Christian significance. But it is a shame, really, because […]

Sleep

It is the night of weeks like this that I long for sleep.  For the kind of sleep that is dark, warm, a kind of death from which I can awake in the morning having enjoyed the oblivion of not-being.  As I leave Samara to sleep she tells me “I am not happy being in […]

There are more important things

This is an article I wrote for the journal here at Lady Shri Ram College for their annual academic journal, The Learning Curve. Theirs is the both the copyright and the inspiration. Reference: Whoolery, M. (2013). There are more important things: Questioning American psychology’s commitment to personal happiness and self-esteem. The Learning Curve, 2 (1), […]